SUBMARINE LOSSES 1904 TO PRESENT DAY - Page 7

HMS B10

9 August 1916

Sunk in Venice by aircraft (No loss of life)

Having taken part in the blockade of Pola, HMS B10 retuned to Venice and tied up alongside the Italian Cruiser Marco Polo, which was acting as depot ship. On 9th August 1916 aircraft of the Austrian Naval Air Service raided the port. B10 was hit and settled on the seabed.

HMS E4

15 August 1916

Sunk of Harwich after collision with HMS E41

Whilst carrying out anti submarine exercises in the North Sea, HMS E41 acting as a target, had begun a surface passage of 12 knots when HMS E4’s periscope appeared 50 yards off her starboard bow, on a collision course. E41 stopped her engines but not before E4 collided forward of the bridge. E41 began to take in water through the forward battery compartment and began to sink by the bow. In less than two minutes the conning tower was under the water. HMS Firdrake, who had been monitoring the exercise, took less than two minutes to reach the scene of the collision to pick up survivors. There were no survivors from E4. Both submarines were eventually located, salvaged and returned to service.

HMS E41

15 August 1916

Sank off Harwich after collision with HMS E4

Whilst carrying out anti submarine exercises in the North Sea, HMS E41 acting as a target, had begun a surface passage of 12 knots when HMS E4’s periscope appeared 50 yards off her starboard bow, on a collision course. E41 stopped her engines but not before E4 collided forward of the bridge. E41 began to take in water through the forward battery compartment and began to sink by the bow. In less than two minutes the conning tower was under the water. HMS Firdrake, who had been monitoring the exercise, took less than two minutes to reach the scene of the collision to pick up survivors. There were no survivors from E4. Both submarines were eventually located, salvaged and returned to service

HMS E16

22 August 1916

Lost in North Sea (unknown cause)

E16 was last sighted thirty-five miles east of Yarmouth by HMS E38. E38 later observed a group of warships moving north, in the vicinity of Terschelling, Splashes were seen near to one of the warships which may have been depth charges exploding. Reports of enemy vessels attacking a periscope on the 22nd August may have been against E16.

HMS E30

22 November 1916

Possibly mined off Orford Ness

E30 left Harwich on November 15th. Sunk in the North Sea, possibly due to a mine off Orford Ness. The minefield was not located until 25th November.

HMS E37

30 November 1916

Cause unknown

HMS E36

19 October 1917

Lost in North Sea possibly after collision with HMS E43

E36 and E43 left Harwich at 0730 on 19th January 1917 for two patrol areas off Terschelling. A strong north easterly was blowing. At 1126 just before they left the coast, E43 signalled to E36 to proceed independently. At 1330 E36 was on the port beam but was out of sight by 1500. The sea was running fairly high and at 1850 E43, having lost her bridge screen, eased to 5 knots and turned 16 points to fit a new one. This delay must have enabled E36 to overtake her, for at 1950 off the Haaks LV, E43 had just altered course to true north when she suddenly sighted a submarine 3 points on the port bow apparently steering east and only 50 yards off. The helm was put hard to starboard and engines full astern but E43 struck E36 aft from the stern, rode right over her and saw her vanish on the starboard quarter in the darkness. E43 went astern but nothing could be seen in the darkness and heavy sea. Nothing more was heard of E36.

HMS K13

29 January 1917

Sank in Gareloch during trials

Just after noon on 29th January 1917, HMS K13, on trials in the Gareloch, signalled to nearby HMS E50 her intention to dive. As the submarine submerged the engine room began to flood. The submarine became uncontrollable and came to rest on the bottom with the engine room and after torpedo room flooded.

The crew of E50 witnessing K13’s rapid dive closed in on the area discovering traces of oil and escaping air breaking the surface. The first rescue vessel arrived around midnight. Divers were sent down to inspect the submarine and just after daybreak on the 30th morse signals were exchanged between the divers and the trapped crew. At 1700 an airline was successfully connected, empty air bottles recharged and ballast tanks blown. With the aid of a hawser slung under her bows K13 was brought to within 8 feet of the surface. By midday of the 31st K13’s bow had been raised ten feet above the water. By 2100 the pressure hull had been breached using oxy-acetylene cutting equipment the survivors being transferred to safety. K13 was finally raised on 15th March, refitted and returned to service as HMS K22.